Teaching

Ecology, Field Biology, and Eco Physiology at undergraduate level - University of Queensland

Tropical conservation BTEC qualification - Froniter: the Society for Environmental Exploration, Madagascar

GCSE Biology- Queensbury School, Erdington, UK. 

Conservation Biology - British Exploring Society, Peru

Jungle training, including rope work, machete use, and mattock use - British Exploring Society, Peruvian Amazon

Supervisor for students science reports - British Exploring Society

Outreach

Madagascar

In 2016 I became a research officer for a company called Frontier in Madagascar. Here, I taught volunteers scientific methods and lead them on abundance and diversity surveys. I also taught volunteers how to use manual callipers as well as how to identify species. 

 

As a research officer my role was to supervise volunteers on personal projects or on their undergraduate dissertation. Some volunteers came to complete a tropical conservation BTEC qualification (10 or 12 weeks), which I taught and graded.  

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Additionally, on a Saturday morning we would head into the community and teach the locals about the environment. We would also go into schools and teach children English. This was greatly appreciated by the teachers and children.

Peru

For 5 weeks in the summer of 2017 I became a Science leader for the British Exploring Society on an expedition to the Peruvian Amazon. For 4 of those weeks, I camped in the jungle teaching volunteers about conservation biology and survey methods. Some of these methods included how to set up camera and mammal traps, how to collect diversity data on transects, and how to identify venomous vs non-venomous snake species.

 

The other week was spent in the community teaching locals about conservation in a small village called Salvacion. We helped build bio-gardens for some of the locals and helped out on agroforestry plots. We also held a workshop in a school to show the community what the volunteers had learnt from coming to the jungle. This was a great success and the community really enjoyed learning about our work in the jungle.

From the wet tropics to the dry deserts